January Microcodmos, Acrylic paint on canvas, 30 x 35 in, 2021.

Bethlehem Star as Transformed December Microcodmos, Acrylic paint on canvas, 29.5 x 37 in, 2021.
Bethlehem Star as Transformed December Microcodmos, Acrylic paint on canvas, 29.5 x 37 in, 2021.
December Microcodmos, Acrylic paint on canvas, 29.5 x 37 in, 2020.
December Microcodmos, Acrylic paint on canvas, 29.5 x 37 in, 2020.

December Black & White Microcodmos, Acrylic paint on canvas, 30 x 35 in, 2020.

NOVEMBER MICROCODMOS, acrylic on canvas, 29.5 x 36.5 in, 2020. Painting inspired by the “November Muse Image”, and conceived for the November Virtual Exhibition at the Hammond Museum.

Microcodmos 1, acrylic on canvas, 22 x 29 in, 2020.

Microcodmos 2, acrylic on canvas, 22 x 29 in, 2020.

Fluid paintings
Microcodmos are fluid paintings created during the pandemic with images from external sources as references. They come from the desire to establish connections and dialogues with other people, using the alchemy of light, shadows, colors and shapes, as a source of inspiration.
We learned some time ago that we are part of an ecosystem, that our minimal individual microcosmic actions have an impact on the macrocosm. The awareness of this however, until recently, was present in our thinking in a distant way.
In 2020, the pandemic made it impossible to ignore the interaction between micro and macrocosms; we are now forced to make a conscious assessment of how our small and minimal interactions can affect not just one, but millions of people.
The time we have to react and adapt to changes has also shrunk. The first known Covid-19 case dates back to mid-November 2019 in China. On March 11, 2020, the World Health Organization declared the outbreak a pandemic. The social isolation necessary to control the spread of the disease has brought about drastic changes worldwide. This is just one example of how intertwined we are with one another. The act of listening and having dialogues have become essential to coexist
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